I love Whodunits. 

 

Although rarely successful, I've always embraced the challenge of trying to figure out who the murderer is before the famous detective. I suppose Agatha Christie is the most well-known writer in this genre, but other famous names who embraced the classic British-style murder mystery include G.K. Chesterton, Edmund Crispin, Michael Innes, and Ellery Queen. 

 

The Whodunit presents crime as a puzzle to be solved, and rather than through a series of questions posed by the detective, readers are given the opportunity to engage in the same process of deduction throughout the investigation of a crime via subtle and sometimes not-so-subtle plot revelations by the author, all in an effort to outguess the expert. 

 

My new thriller is a Whodunit written more in the American crime fiction style, popularized by authors such as Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett and Mickey Spillane. Although employing the classic "double narrative" style of the British, American Whodunits typically feature more gritty, realistic settings and colloquial dialogue and narrative compared to their "cozier" British relatives. 

 

In Blood Sisters, Libby Meeker believes she's seeing things. Although her identical twin sister died almost a year ago in a tragic accident, Libby is seeing Melissa outside her office window, in passing cars and buses, and even walking out of their small-town bank. When a serial murder surfaces in Norther Utah, bizarre clues and an ancient Native American artifact lead Salt Lake City Detective Troy Hunter along with the reader to Libby's doorstep…and into nearly unspeakable possibilities. Only the most skilled murder mystery reader will figure this one out!

 

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